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JADE

 

Roasted Spring Jade

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Jade Tea ? Qing Chá

aka Wu Lóng chá (Black Dragon tea)

Fresh green tea leaf ? Withering ? Bruising ? Oxidization 5-70% ? Baking/Roasting ? Rolling ? Drying ? +/- Post Roasting = Jade Tea

Semi oxidized (10-70% oxidization) green tea leaf is collectively known as qing chá (jade/blue-green, tea) in its' provincial origins.blackdragon1IronGoddess1a1 This is based on the color of the infused tea water. Jade has long been referred to by the misnomer "Wu'Lóng (Black Dragon)". Wu'Lóng originally refers to certain Southeastern Chinese native cultivars of wild mountain tea trees from Fèng'Huáng Shan (Phoenix Mountain) in Guang'Dong Province that also migrated to An'Xi County of Fu'Jian Province. This varietal lends well to the semi-oxidization process & rolling and bruising methods used in Jade tea types. The common use of the dated spelling 'Oolong' is a Western way of writing Wu'Lóng (Black Dragon) which is said to refer to both the shape of the leaf and legend of black snakes (dragons) seen resting at the base of the original Wu'Lóng cultivar tea trees. Tea tree Cultivars with medium sized leaves are most often used to make Jade style tea. The leaves are also thicker enabling them to resist the rigors of Jade production. Jade teas can vary greatly from green to darker shades depending on oxidization level or further browned leaves of roasted Jade.

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WHITE | GREEN | JADE | RED | BLACK | SCENTED | TISANE | BAMBOO

RoastedTenderBranchRuanZhi Roasted Spring Jade